1.18.2016

Jose Fuentes, ordered deported upon release and still waiting> WHY?

latest on Jose Fuentes:He has been eligible for deportation back to Columbia since he has been parole eligible-2009. His family is waiting. He was give a one month defer in October 2015. You can imagine the excitement Jose and his family felt. that meant he would be coming home in a month. That is what short defers mean right? NOT anymore - All hope was whisked away in the next month- He will see the parole board again in 2017. Cruel joke.
here are links to the parole actions:
1)2014 parole decision: not enough time for punishment:parole decision 2014
2)October 2015 decision: Next parole date in one month!!!
3)November 2015: .Juan will wait over a year for his 10th parole hearing .No Parole . Juan will see the parole in 2017. Cruel Joke on Juan and his family

Click to sign petition for release:
 http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/petition-for-release-3?source=c.em.cp&r_by=10992208

Jose Fuentes 309759 
 Stanley Correctional Inst.
 100 Corrections Drive Stanley, WI 54768

"Mr. and Mrs. taxpayer. What about the incarcerated undocumented immigrants? Do you know that you are still footing the bill to keep them incarcerated long after they have finished all their required programs and long after a Federal Judge issued orders for these inmates to be deported. These immigrants would be deported out of the United States and no longer be a threat to society. Instead of deportation and saving Wisconsin taxpayer money, the Department of Corrections and the Parole Board are keeping them incarcerated to serve their entire sentence. Again, to fuel the Wisconsin prison industry and a big waste of taxpayer money."


In 2005, I had a teleconference with a Federal Judge in Chicago where he issued a deportation order for me to be deported back to Mexico. A copy of the order is below.
I was sentenced in 1995, so I am under the old law. I have served 20-years of my 40-year sentence and have completed all of my required programs.
I have seen the Parole Board 8 times, and each time, instead of discussing the deportation order, I am told that they want me to serve more time.
   I have the love and support of my entire family who have written several letters over the years to the DOC expressing their support.
My sister has a kidney disease and has to go through kidney dialysis every week. I told my sister that once I am back in Mexico, I would donate to her one of my kidneys so she wouldn't have to go through dialysis anymore and could start living a more normal life.
My father owns a farm in Mexico. He is 80-years old and has diabetes.

His health has been failing him and it's getting harder and harder for him to run the farm. If I was allowed to be deported, I would be able to take over the duties from my father so he could relax a little and enjoy his remaining years. I have worked the farm and know all phases of farming so I would be able to manage and work the farm myself.
But after doing everything the DOC has asked of me, it never seems to be enough. When is it time to give up?
read deportation documents in pdf form
 


Read essay "Is he prison system Broken? " in pdf form
full test below :  



Is The Wisconsin Prison System Broken?

    With the current rate of incarceration—one out of every 100 people in the United States are incarcerated—in Wisconsin, there is a good chance that even the best of families could lose a family member to the Wisconsin prison system.

When a court finds a person guilty of a crime, the judge orders, under the sentencing guidelines, the appropriate sentence as punishment.

The Department of Corrections duties are to implement the court order, provide housing, security, and programs to educate and rehabilitate prisoners and prepare them for a reasonable chance for parole so they may be reunited with their families and become productive citizens.

Most prisoners (at least in Wisconsin prisons), both old law prisoners and truth-in-sentence prisoners do not believe this is the case. Prisoners believe that they have been dehumanized and have become commodified—warehoused and used to fuel the huge Wisconsin prison industry. And it is a huge industry at the cost of human beings and a waste of taxpayer money.

When Wisconsin citizens talk about big government and how their tax money is being spent, they have to look no further then the Wisconsin Department of Corrections and the Wisconsin prison system to see just how big and how costly this system has become, and how much waste of taxpayer money.

As an industry, the prison system as is, benefits by incarcerating more people and to keep as many current prisoners—including old law prisoners who are eligible for parole—incarcerated as long as possible.

The more prisoners, the more guards and staff to be hired and more institu­tions to be built. All on the Wisconsin taxpayers dime. And the politicians can claim they're tough on crime, and at the same time, creating jobs.

Again on the taxpayers dime. This is the waste of tax revenue that citizens have to realize.

Wouldn't it be more advantageous to the Wisconsin taxpayer and families that lost fathers, mothers, brothers and sisters stuck in this broken system and instead allow inmates to be paroled when eligible and deserving and become productive citizens again so they may provide for their families.

   It would be a win-win for society. The former inmate now being a productive member of society and contributing to the tax coffer, while at the same time providing for the family so they could get off welfare. All while lowering the Wisconsin prison population and saving taxpayer money.

      When available, most prisoners have completed their required programs and have been rehabilitated. They are no longer a threat to the public.Yet to keep the prisons at full capacity, old law prisoners who are eligible for parole are told by the Parole Board that, because of the seriousness of the offense sufficient time has not been served, or there is still an unreason­able risk to the public. Old law prisoners serving a set-year sentence are eligible for parole after serving 25% of their sentence. Prisoners serving a life sentence are eligible for parole after serving 13 years. The excuses to refuse parole are to justify keeping a person incarcerated and fuel the prison industry.

      Mr. and Mrs. taxpayer. What about the incarcerated undocumented immigrants? Do you know that you are still footing the bill to keep them incarcerated long after they have finished all their required programs and long after a Federal Judge issued orders for these inmates to be deported. These immigrants would be deported out of the United States and no longer be a threat to society. Instead of deportation and saving Wisconsin taxpayer money, the Department of Corrections and the Parole Board are keeping them incarcerated to serve their entire sentence. Again, to fuel the Wisconsin prison industry and a big waste of taxpayer money.

Wouldn't this wasted taxpayer money be put to wiser use by improving our education system and providing our classrooms with the latest technology so our children are better prepared for the future? And in the long run, this would improve the economy, reduce the crime rate, and shed the reputation of Wisconsin having a bloated prison population.

But at the end of the day, it's up to you, the Wisconsin taxpayer, to decide how you want your hard earned money to be spent.
 

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